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10 Places That Will Bring You Closer to Your Favourite Book

By reading books, we travel across the world without taking a single step. However, there are certain places, which will immediately remind you of your favourite book. They are intricately linked with your memory of the book and visiting them only makes the memory of the book more precious.

Here are 10 such places that featured in some of the most iconic books. Visit them as a tribute to your favourite book.

Stephen King's The Shining and The Stanley Hotel 

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Stephen King's celebrated 1977 horror novel, The Shining, which dealt with the paranormal activity of The Stanley Hotel, immortalised the place forever. The hotel, till today, attracts thousands of patrons and offers a guided tour featuring the history and the paranormal activity of the place.

Elizabeth Gilbert's Eat, Pray, Love and Bali 

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Elizabeth Gilbert's Eat, Pray, Love that was later made into a film, is essentially about the soul-searching journey of a woman. Though Italy and India could have easily been mentioned, it is in Bali where the protagonist finds her love and it is only fitting that this place, among the rest, most acutely reminds you of the place.

Henning Mankell's Kurt Wallander novels and Ystad

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Swedish author Henry Mankell's detective series featuring Kurt Wallander is extensively situated in the small town of Ystad. The changing lifestyle of the place and the sudden surge in the crime rates form the central axis in the novel. 

Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes series and 221 Baker Street 

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The residential address of the iconic sleuth Sherlock Holmes became as iconic as his address -- 221 Baker Street in London -- and even today, it has become synonymous with Sherlock Holmes and his adventures.

James Joyce's Dubliners and Dublin  

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You cannot take Dublin out of James Joyce's novels. Be it Ulysses or Dubliners, Dublin is a witness to all the pathos and the anxiety the characters of Joyce's novels go through.

Orhan Pamuk's Istanbul and Istanbul 

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The master storyteller Orhan Pamuk firmly places his stories in Istanbul and, in his novel of the same name, you can feel the pulse of the place through his vivid descriptions. 

Amitav Ghosh's The Shadow Lines and Southern Avenue in Kolkata 

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Amitav Ghosh's celebrated novel, The Shadow Lines that traces the journey of the narrator, begins in Southern Avenue. Describing a Kolkata that no longer exists, the long, deserted stretch of Southern Avenue not only features prominently in the novel, but it is also the place where the narrator meets Tridib. Even today, a walk down the path will certainly remind you of the novel.

Truman Capote's Breakfast at Tiffany's and the Tiffany store 

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Truman Capote's famous novel Breakfast at Tiffany's, that was later made into a film, opened the doors of Tiffany's to the world and, thanks to Audrey Hepburn in the film, we could never get enough of it. A walk down the store or even a brief mention of it inevitably reminds us of the book and certainly of the film. 

Ruskin Bond's Roads to Mussoorie and Mussoorie 

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This is merely one of the several books that the legendary author places in Mussoorie. The Queen of Hills, as the place is fondly known, is not only the abode of the author but features, time and again, in all his novels. 

Rohinton Mistry's Such A Long Journey and Dadar Parsi Colony

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The acclaimed author in his novel, Such A Long Journey, described the intricate details of this famous Parsi colony and made it palpable and real.

How many of these have you visited yet?

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